The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices


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The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices

articles

Promising Practices in First Nations Child Welfare Management and Governance: Weechi-it-te-win Family Services: Utilizing a Decentralized Model in the Provision of Bi-Cultural Services
Prepared by: Peter Ferris, Estelle Simard, George Simard & Jacqueline Ramdatt, (2005)

  http://www.fncfcs.com/sites/default/files/docs/WFSPromisingPractices.pdf


Abstract:
This article is an organizational account of Weechi-it-te-win Family Services and their unique bi-cultural practice model. Set as a promising practice, the article offers practiced based evidence on a decentralized child welfare service model. The authors provide a systematic view of the approach needed to carry a decentralized model of service delivery, beginning with community governance, elders council, bi-cultural practice, cultural competency integration throughout the service model, and transformational leadership at the heart of the practice. This article offers an alternative approach to child welfare service delivery.



Applying Maslow's Hierarchy Theory to the Research Needs of FNCFS Agencies participating in Cycle II of the Canadian Incident Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect. Marlyn Bennett and Corbin Shangreaux with assistance from Estelle Simard, Clifford Manyheads, Therese Tupper, Kathy Bent, Laurie Rose, Vincent McKay, Janet Douglas and Melanie Scott.

http://www.fncfcs.com/sites/default/files/online-journal/vol2num1/Bennett_Shangreaux_pp89.pdf


Abstract:
This paper evolved from the outcome of a feedback held between the principle researchers of Cycle II of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and a number of representatives of the First Nations Child and Family Service Agencies (FNCFS Agencies) which participated in Cycle II of the CIS(CIS-2003) and numerous Research Assistants tasked with collecting information from the FNCFS Agencies. The authors present a profile of the historical and contemporary experiences of Aboriginal children and families who come into contact with the child welfare system and include a discussion on some of the findings from two analyses that have been conducted on the data from the 1998 Canadian Incident Study of Reported Child Abuse and neglect (CIS-98). An overview of the challenges as well as the positive aspect of the study from the perspectives of the FNCFS Agencies and the Research Assistants is included along with an examination as to why research may not figure prominently among the service priorities of FNCFS Agencies. The strengths of challenges of participating in CIIS-2003 provide rich insight into the perspectives of the Research Assistants and FNCFS Agencies who participated in this national study. The paper concluded with recommendations by the FNCFS Agencies and the Research Assistants on how to improve the data collection process with FNCFS Agencies for future Cycles of the Canadian Incident Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect.



University of Minnesota Duluth Master of Social Work Plan B Research: Culturally Restorative Child Welfare Practice: A special emphasis on cultural attachment theory. December 1, 2009

Abstract:
This thesis entails the examination of culturally restorative child welfare practice and how this type of practice is one of the cornerstones for the rebuilding of a Nation. For centuries, governmental laws, regulations, policies, and practices have impacted First Nation people, families, and communities. These laws have had latent consequences for First Nation people and have resulted in the creation of generations upon generations of social welfare casualties. Although these federal and provincial laws have negatively influenced First Nation people, there is a quality of resiliency that has persevered within the Nation. The innate resiliency of cultural attachment theory has resurged as the central premise of purpose for Native child welfare initiatives across Canada. The need to build these services on Traditional Law to support the Cultural Identity Formation of a First Nation child is a big part of culturally restorative child welfare practices. The building of systems to support the development of culturally competent service delivery in addition to the administrative harmonization between two distinct governing Laws is a threshold of competence emerging across the First Nations of Canada. Examining the promotion of culturally restorative child welfare practice and providing an analysis of the relevance to native child welfare initiatives is the central theme of this paper.

To view Culturally Restorative Child Welfare Practice: A special emphasis on cultural attachment theory Educational Seminar Sample, please click here.


Culturally Restorative Child Welfare Practice: A special emphasis on cultural attachment theory.

Simard, E., (2009). Culturally Restorative Child Welfare Practice - A special emphasis on cultural attachment theory. First Peoples Child & Family Review: An Interdisciplinary Journal Honoring the Voices, Perspectives and Knowledges of First Peoples through Research, Critical Analyses, Stories, Standpoints and Media Reviews, 4, 2, p.44-61. Retrieved on December 12, 2009 from:


Abstract:
This is a peer reviewed scholarly article which contains excerpts from Simard's original MSW thesis: University of Minnesota Duluth - Master of Social Work Plan B Research: Culturally Restorative Child Welfare Practice: A special emphasis on cultural attachment theory. A research project was implemented through the use of qualitative secondary data analysis to describe a theory of culturally restorative child welfare practice with the application of cultural attachment theory. The research documented 20 years of service practice that promoted Anishinaabe cultural identity and cultural attachment strategies, by fostering the natural cultural resiliencies that exist within the Anishinaabe nation. The research brings a suggested methodology to child welfare services for First Nation children the greater the application of cultural attachment strategies the greater the response to cultural restoration processes within a First Nation community.



Developing a Culturally Restorative Approach to Aboriginal Child and Youth Development: Transitions to Adulthood.

Abstract:
A new, innovative approach to providing "care" to Aboriginal child and youth who make a transition into adulthood embodies the concept of culturally restorative practice. This paper will provide a thorough and complete discussion to Aboriginal child development for children and youth transitioning from youth and adult. A review of the literature was undertaken and highlights the following: culturally restorative practices, contextual implications on current issues, best practices for successful engagement with Aboriginal populations, western development theories, thematic of Aboriginal development, as well as implications for child and youth services. Key words: Aboriginal child development, Aboriginal developmental theory

To view Developing a Culturally Restorative Approach to Aboriginal Child and Youth Development: Transitions to Adulthood please click here.

http://www.fncfcs.com/sites/default/files/online-journal/vol6num1/Simard_Blight_pp28-55rvsd3.pdf